Fall 2013 PSA – Smoke Detectors

With fall in the air and winter quickly approaching, the Ketchum Fire Department would like to take this opportunity to remind all citizens of the importance of having properly functioning smoke alarms in your home.
When a fire breaks out, you have only seconds to escape its heat, black smoke and deadly gases. You can dramatically increase the chances of surviving a fire simply by installing and maintaining working smoke alarms in your home. This life-saving device can help alert you and your family to a fire and increase the time you have to escape.
Follow these simple tips to help make your home a safer place:
• Place a smoke alarm on every level of your home and in each bedroom.
• Check smoke alarms monthly by pushing the test button. If you cannot reach the button easily, use a broom handle.
• Change the batteries in your alarms at least once a year – perhaps when you change your clocks for Daylight Saving Time.
• If cooking smoke sets off the alarm, do not disable it. Turn on the range fan, open a window or wave a towel near the alarm.
• Smoke alarms wear out over time. Replace yours if it is 10 years old or more.
To learn more about the importance of smoke alarms in your home, click on the following link for information from the U.S. Fire Administration:
http://www.usfa.fema.gov/campaigns/smokealarms/alarms/index.shtm
So, this Sunday, when you go through your home setting all of your clocks back an hour, be sure to check all of your smoke alarms and go ahead and install new batteries while you’re there. You may well save the life of someone you love!

Lt. Greg Martin
Ketchum Fire Department

Hotshot 19 Memorial Workout

Granite Mountain Hotshots

Granite Mountain Hotshots

On June 30th, 2013 19 firefighters from the Granite Mountain Hotshots  perished in The Yarnell Hill Fire in Arizona. In order to honor their sacrifice and to raise money and awareness for their families , the Crossfit nation put on a fundraiser workout. 6 rounds for time; 30 air squats, 19 power cleans, 7 strict pull up and a 400 meter run.

Held on August 31 across the nation, we raised over $300,000. The Ketchum Professional Firefighters Local 4758 were proud to participate with our local Crossfit affiliate, Sun Valley Crossfit. Both at the Ketchum Fire Department station 1 and at the SV Crossfit box site in Ketchum Idaho, people gathered and truly put their hearts, sweat and love into a workout that managed to bring home the pain and struggle of these firefighters, while at the same time helping us all find some hope in a world that can join forces and help a healing process begin.

Early on the morning of the 31st, Crossfitters gathered at SV Crossfit in a more somber than usual manner.  They started the workout in almost silence, in contrast to the usual accompaniment of heart pumping music, as a nod to the somber reason we were all there. The only sounds were breathing, weighted barbells dropping and the words of encouragement from the coaches. Across the small town, later that evening, some of us firefighters gathered around engines and ambulances for our turn at the workout.

In fact, all across the country the same thing was happening in all sorts of different settings, well -equipped boxes, garage gyms, city parks and fire stations. But one thing was the same wherever you might have been; for each repetition of the 19 power cleans, we thought, whispered or spoke the names of each of our fallen comrades. And when we finished, we all just stopped for a moment to catch our breath, and to think about how it would feel to not be able to do just that.

In memorium

In memorium

 

 

2013 MDA Fill the Boot

 

Sun Valley, ID Firefighters L4758 & L4923 Nearly Triple Fill the Boot Fundraiser!

Tue, 09/03/2013 – 11:17am — tgianelli

Ketchum, ID  Firefighters L4758 and Wood River,ID L4923 joined forces in Ketchum, Idaho’s annual “Wagon Days” parade to raise nearly $10,000 for MDA – an increase of over $6000 from 2012. Citizens of and visitors to Ketchum rallied to show thanks and support for firefighters’ recent efforts in the 111,000 acre Beaver Creek wildfire that threatened the communities of Ketchum, Hailey, and Bellevue, Idaho last month, by helping the Locals report a record breaking Fill the Boot for MDA.

Nick Hanauer


Be FireWise

FIREWISE TOOLKIT

FIREWISE / TIPS FOR HOMEOWNERS

Firewise tips checklist for homeowners

WILDFIRE DOESN’T HAVE TO BURN everything in its path. In fact, cleaning your property of debris and maintaining your landscaping are important first steps to helping minimize damage and loss.

The work you do today can make a difference. Follow these simple action steps now and throughout the year to prepare and help reduce the risk of your home and property becoming fuel for a wildfire:

 

1) Clear leaves and other debris from gutters, eaves, porches and decks. This prevents embers from igniting your home.

2) Remove dead vegetation from under your deck and within 10 feet of the house.

3) Remove anything stored underneath decks or porches.

4) Screen or box-in areas below patios and decks with wire mesh to prevent debris and combustible materials from accumulating.

5) Remove flammable materials (firewood stacks, propane tanks, dry vegetation) within 30 feet of your home’s foundation and outbuildings, including garages and sheds. If it can catch fire, don’t let it touch your house, deck or porch.

6) Wildfire can spread to tree tops. If you have trees on your property, prune so the lowest branches are 6 to 10 feet from the ground.

7) Keep your lawn hydrated and maintained. If it is brown, cut it down to reduce fire intensity. Dry grass and shrubs are fuel for wildfire.

8) Don’t let debris and lawn cuttings linger. Dispose of these items quickly to reduce fuel for fire.

9) Inspect shingles or roof tiles. Replace or repair those that are loose or missing to prevent ember penetration.

10) Cover exterior attic vents with metal wire mesh no larger than 1/8 inch to prevent sparks from entering the home.

11) Enclose under-eave and soffit vents or screen with metal mesh to prevent ember entry.

Learn more

about how to keep your family safe and reduce your home’s risk for wildfire damage at www.firewise.org.